microtime()

This function returns the current Unix timestamp with microseconds.

Syntax: microtime(get_as_float)

Description:

The argument “get_as_float” is Optional. When set to true it specifies that the function should return a float, instead of a string.

Note: This function returns the string “microsec sec”, where sec is the number of seconds since the Unix Epoch (0:00:00 January 1, 1970 GMT),and microsec is the microseconds part. Notice that both parts are returned in units of seconds.

Note: The get_as_float parameter was added to PHP 5!

Example:
Code:

echo(microtime());

Output:

0.03691400 1302507097

localtime()

The function returns an array that contains the time components of a Unix timestamp.

Syntax: localtime(timestamp,is_associative)

Description:

The first argument “timestamp” is Optional. It specifies the date or time to be formatted. If no timestamp is specified, it uses the current local time.

The second argument “is_associative” is Optional. It specifies whether to return an associative or indexed array. If set to false the array returned is an indexed array. If set to true then the array returned is an associative array.

The keys of the associative array are:

* [tm_sec] – seconds
* [tm_min] – minutes
* [tm_hour] – hour
* [tm_mday] – day of the month
* [tm_mon] – month of the year (January=0)
* [tm_year] – Years since 1900
* [tm_wday] – Day of the week (Sunday=0)
* [tm_yday] – Day of the year
* [tm_isdst] – Is daylight savings time in effect

Example:
Code:

$localtime  = localtime();
$localtime_assoc = localtime(time(), true);
print_r($localtime);
print_r($localtime_assoc);

Output:

Array (
[0] => 6
[1] => 27
[2] => 6
[3] => 11
[4] => 3
[5] => 111
[6] => 1
[7] => 100
[8] => 0
)

Array (
[tm_sec] => 6
[tm_min] => 27
[tm_hour] => 6
[tm_mday] => 11
[tm_mon] => 3
[tm_year] => 111
[tm_wday] => 1
[tm_yday] => 100
[tm_isdst] => 0
)

gmmktime()

This function returns a Unix timestamp for a GMT date.

Syntax:gmmktime(hour,minute,second,month,day,year,is_dst)

Description:

The first argument “hour” is Optional. It specifies the hour.

The second argument “minute” is Optional. It specifies the minute.

The third argument “second” is Optional. It specifies the second.

The fourth argument “month” is Optional. It specifies the numerical month.

The five argument “day” is Optional. It specifies the day.

The six argument “year” is Optional. It specifies the year. The valid range for year is on some systems between 1901 and 2038. However this limitation is overcome in PHP5

The sevent argument “is_dst” is Optional. It Set this parameter to 1 if the time is during daylight savings time (DST), 0 if it is not, or -1 (the default) if it is unknown. If it’s unknown, PHP tries to find out itself (which may cause unexpected results).

Note: This function is identical to mktime() except the passed parameters represents a GMT date.

Example:
Code:

$time = gmmktime(0,0,0,4,11,2011);
print($time . "
"); print(date("M-d-Y",$time));

Output:

1302480000
Apr-11-2011

gmdate()

This function formats a GMT/UTC date/time.

Syntax: gmdate(format,timestamp)

Description:

The first argument “format” is Required. It specifies how to return the result:

* d – The day of the month (from 01 to 31)
* D – A textual representation of a day (three letters)
* j – The day of the month without leading zeros (1 to 31)
* l (lowercase ‘L’) – A full textual representation of a day
* N – The ISO-8601 numeric representation of a day (1 for Monday through 7 for Sunday)
* S – The English ordinal suffix for the day of the month (2 characters st, nd, rd or th. Works well with j)
* w – A numeric representation of the day (0 for Sunday through 6 for Saturday)
* z – The day of the year (from 0 through 365)
* W – The ISO-8601 week number of year (weeks starting on Monday)
* F – A full textual representation of a month (January through December)
* m – A numeric representation of a month (from 01 to 12)
* M – A short textual representation of a month (three letters)
* n – A numeric representation of a month, without leading zeros (1 to 12)
* t – The number of days in the given month
* L – Whether it’s a leap year (1 if it is a leap year, 0 otherwise)
* o – The ISO-8601 year number
* Y – A four digit representation of a year
* y – A two digit representation of a year
* a – Lowercase am or pm
* A – Uppercase AM or PM
* B – Swatch Internet time (000 to 999)
* g – 12-hour format of an hour (1 to 12)
* G – 24-hour format of an hour (0 to 23)
* h – 12-hour format of an hour (01 to 12)
* H – 24-hour format of an hour (00 to 23)
* i – Minutes with leading zeros (00 to 59)
* s – Seconds, with leading zeros (00 to 59)
* e – The timezone identifier (Examples: UTC, Atlantic/Azores)
* I (capital i) – Whether the date is in daylights savings time (1 if Daylight Savings Time, 0 otherwise)
* O – Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) in hours (Example: +0100)
* T – Timezone setting of the PHP machine (Examples: EST, MDT)
* Z – Returns 0
* c – The ISO-8601 date (e.g. 2004-02-12T15:19:21+00:00)
pills online pharmacy * r – The RFC 2822 formatted date (e.g. Thu, 21 Dec 2000 16:01:07 +0200)
* U – The seconds since the Unix Epoch (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT)

The second argument “timestamp” is Optional.

Example:
Code:

echo date("M d Y H:i:s", mktime(0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2011))."
"; echo gmdate("M d Y H:i:s", mktime(0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2011));

Output:

Jan 01 2011 00:00:00
Jan 01 2011 00:00:00

Explanation:

This function is Identical to the date() function except that the time returned is Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) when this code is run in Finland (GMT +0200), the first line below prints “Jan 01 2011 00:00:00”, while the second prints “Dec 31 2011 22:00:00”.

date_default_timezone_set()

This function sets the default timezone used by all date/time functions.

Syntax: date_default_timezone_set(timezone)

Description:

The argument “timezone” is Required. The timezone identifier,like “UTC” or “Europe/Paris”.

Example:
Code:

echo(date_default_timezone_set("UTC"));

Output:

1

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